What is the SAFE Vehicles Rule?

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Deputy Administrator Heidi King recently addressed Congress to discuss Safer Affordable Fuel Efficient (SAFE) vehicles. She pointed out that while newer vehicles are safer and more environmentally friendly than older vehicles, the price of a new car can discourage individuals from replacing their older cars. King also noted that there are already more cars than adults in the United States.

In 2018, the NHTSA and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed the SAFE Vehicles Rule to set new fuel economy and greenhouse gas standards for passenger cars and light trucks in model years 2021-2026. However, King shared that the average price of a new vehicle is more than $37,000. New vehicle prices have increased by about 29% in the past decade. Meanwhile, the automotive industry is still struggling to meet the current fuel economy targets.

The NHTSA and EPA are partnering to make sure that the final SAFE Vehicle rule is “reasonable, appropriate, transparent, and consistent with the law given current facts and conditions,” King stated.

The proposed SAFE Vehicles Rule would amend existing tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions standards and establish new standards. The NHTSA and EPA believe that if the rule is adopted, it could save more than $500 billion in societal costs and decrease highway fatalities by 12,700 lives. Curious about what is happening with this legislation? You can follow the latest updates here.

With over 40 years of experience, John Schuerman is a compassionate advocate for injury victims and their families while being an aggressive fighter for justice and full compensation for their claims. If you or a loved one have suffered an injury from a car accident, call 1-800-274-0045 today for a free consultation. Evening and weekend appointments are available in addition to home and hospital visits.

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